viernes, 30 de noviembre de 2012

The 'frozen wave'


At first glance these beautiful images from the Antarctic appear to show 50-ft tall waves that have been instantly frozen as they break.
Some people have posted the pictures online, taken by scientist Tony Travouillon at Dumont D'Urville, with a description claiming they are a tsunami wave which was frozen.
But although email chains and internet forums back this claim up, what is really pictured is the natural phenomenon of blue ice.

Read more 











A força do oceano


Mark Tipple é o principal fotógrafo de uma iniciativa chamada The Underwater Project, com interessantes imagens captadas sob as águas.
Tipple inicialmente tentou fotografar nadadores, mas acabou voltando suas atenções ao poder das ondas.
As cenas fotografadas por ele, sem nenhuma presença humana, oferecem uma perspectiva única da força e da energia dos oceanos.
Tripple já fotografou mares da Austrália, Indonésia, ilhas no Pacífico, costa oeste dos Estados Unidos e do Alasca. Ele sempre viveu ao lado do oceano.
Mais informações sobre o trabalho do fotógrafo podem ser encontradas no site www.marktipple.com.


Mark Tipple é o principal fotógrafo de uma iniciativa chamada The Underwater Project, que foca nos elos da Austrália com os oceanos. Veja a seguir as fotos tiradas sob ondas prestes a chegar na areia. Mais informações sobre o trabalho do fotógrafo podem ser encontradas no site www.marktipple.com.


Tipple inicialmente tentou fotografar nadadores, mas acabou voltando suas atenções ao poder das ondas, em uma série chamada "Mare Vida".


"Certo dia, foi pego por uma grande onda. E, enquanto afundava, comecei a pensar no que (os nadadores) passavam (sob as ondas), e liguei a minha câmera", diz o fotógrafo. "Percebi que fico cada vez mais submerso para ver o que acontece com a passagem das ondas."


Numa viagem recente a ilhas no Pacífico, Tipple estava fotografando um amigo quando este acabou se cortando em corais. O amigo acabou saindo da água, mas Tipple permaneceu, fotografando as ondas.


Para mim já chega, cara, já chega", disse o amigo, Mike, ao caminhar em direção à costa. De longe, Tipple diz que conseguia ver o sangue do ferimento escorrendo do braço do amigo.


"Isso ocorreu na primeira hora de uma sessão de fotos de dez dias", conta Tipple. "Nós dois sabíamos que os corais nas Ilhas Cook ficavam (em água) rasa, mas para o Underwater Project não usamos pranchas nem roupas protetoras. Isso aumenta muito o risco de se cortar."


Tipple assistiu a saída de cena de seu amigo e começou a pensar no que mais poderia fotografar sob as águas.


As imagens resultantes, sem nenhuma presença humana, oferecem uma perspectiva única da força e da energia dos oceanos.


O caos visual percebido sob as ondas também destaca a luta pela sobrevivência no ambiente marinho.



Tipple já fotografou mares da Austrália, Indonésia, ilhas no Pacífico, costa oeste dos EUA e do Alasca. Ele sempre viveu ao lado do oceano.

Fonte: BBC Brasil 

Sweet Seas. Portraits of the Great Lakes A new book of photographs by Mark Schacter


Book cover

Imagine standing alone on a moonlit night on the deck of a 730-foot lake freighter somewhere on northern Lake Huron, taking photographs. This was the most memorable of many memorable experiences during six months of gathering material for my book of photographs Sweet Seas. Portraits of the Great Lakes, just published in Canada by Fifth House. (Sweet Seas will be released in the US and worldwide in early 2013.)


Cuyahoga River (Cleveland, Ohio)

My five days on the Mapleglen, a Canada Steamship Lines vessel carrying grain from Thunder Bay, Ontario to Port Cartier, Quebec, was one of two ship-borne journeys that gave me a unique perspective on the Great Lakes. I also had the pleasure of sailing on the Grand Mariner as a guest of Blount Small Ship Adventures on a 7-day pleasure cruise around Lake Michigan. 


Iron ore dock (Marquett, Michigan)

Between April and October 2011 I travelled – mostly by car –around all of the five Great Lakes (the 17th-century French explorers called them the “sweet seas”) in both Canada and the US. I snapped about 10,000 photographs which I culled down to the 160 you will see in the book. I also wrote two essays for Sweet Seas: one describing the freighter trip and the other addressing the environmental challenges facing the Great Lakes today.


Janet Head near Gore Bay, Ontario


MV Indiana Harbor (Near Sault Ste. Maria, Michigan)


Dune Grass (Beverley Shores, Indiana)

Sweet Seas portrays the diversity of the Great Lakes region: not only the water and the surrounding natural environment, but also the ports, the locks and waterways of the St. Lawrence Seaway, the towns, cities and industrial zones. It was a great pleasure to produce it, and I hope you will enjoy it.

Technical note: most of the photographs were shot between April and October 2011 with a Canon EOS 1Ds Mark III 35 mm-format digital cameras using lenses in focal length from 12 mm to 400 mm.

To Buy the book:
List price is $39.95 purchase for $24.04 at Amazon.ca
ISBN 978-1-92708-302-4
Fifth House Ltd. Markham, Ontario
2012\2013 

Mark Schacter provided a previous article for the Canadian Nature Photographer "Bring on the Clouds" you can view by clicking here.


Mark Schacter, a self taught photographer, was born in Thunder Bay and left when he was 16. The city left a lasting impression on how he sees the world and he translates that vision in photography. 
An accomplished journalist, Mark has a Bachelor of Arts (Philosophy) from Yale University, A Bachelor of Law from University College, Oxford University and a Masters of Business Administration from the University of Ottawa. Hie is the owner and operator of amanagement consutling firm.
Mark Schacter lives in Ottawa with his wife, two daughters and two cats.


jueves, 29 de noviembre de 2012

Hawaiian volcano puts on beautiful but deadly show as lava spills into the ocean

Waves crash over lava as it flows into the ocean near Volcanoes National Park in Kalapana, Hawaii on November 27, 2012. - REUTERS/Hugh Gentry

A volcano on Hawaii’s largest island is spilling lava into the ocean, creating a rare and spectacular fusion of steam and waves that officials said on Tuesday could attract thrill-seeking visitors if it continues.

A plume of smoke rises from the volcanic activity in Kilauea crater in Volcanoes National Park in Volcano, Hawaii on November 27, 2012. - REUTERS/Hugh Gentry

Lava from a vent in Kilauea Volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii began flowing into the ocean seven miles away on Saturday. The volcano has been erupting continuously from its Pu’u O’o vent since 1983.
The flow was the first from the volcano to reach the ocean since December, said Janet Babb, spokeswoman for the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.
Even as Hawaii tourism officials awaited an increase in visitors drawn by the explosive natural show, officials warned of potentially deadly risks and urged visitors to stay a safe distance away and respect barriers placed around the lava flow.


Waves crash over lava as it flows into the ocean near Volcanoes National Park in Kalapana, Hawaii on November 27, 2012. - REUTERS/Hugh Gentry

“Ocean entries can be quite beautiful but also quite dangerous,” Babb said.
When the lava reaches the ocean, it cools, darkens and hardens into a lava delta amid an outpouring of steam. The lava delta is newly created land that is unstable and can collapse without warning.
When it collapses, even visitors standing 100 yards (meters) away can be hurt because large chunks of lava and hot water are hurled their direction by the collapse, Babb said.

Waves crash over lava as it flows into the ocean near Volcanoes National Park in Kalapana, Hawaii on November 27, 2012. - REUTERS/Hugh Gentry

“The molten lava meeting the ocean creates steam which may look innocuous, but can be quite hazardous,” she said. “It’s acidic and contains tiny particles of volcanic glass. And waves crashing with the lava can send out scalding water.”
It was not clear how long the lava would continue flowing into the ocean.
George Applegate, director of the Big Island Visitors Bureau, said he expected an increase in tourists due to the latest occurrence of the phenomenon. “We always do,” Applegate said. “A lot of people want to see a live lava flow.”

Waves crash over lava as it flows into the ocean near Volcanoes National Park in Kalapana, Hawaii on November 27, 2012. - REUTERS/Hugh Gentry

Tourism officials declined to estimate how many more visitors they might see on the Big Island because of the lava flow. Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, which encompasses Kilauea, welcomed more than 1.3 million visitors last year, according to park spokeswoman Jessica Ferracane.
Security workers were keeping people beyond the barriers during approved viewing hours, said Barry Periatt, plans and operations officer for Hawaii County’s Civil Defense Agency.
No communities around the volcano are threatened by the lava flow, Periatt said. The nearest town is Kalapana Gardens, which is more than half a mile away. It suffered major damage from a 1986 volcano flow.

Waves crash over lava as it flows into the ocean near Volcanoes National Park in Kalapana, Hawaii on November 27, 2012. - REUTERS/Hugh Gentry


 Credits: National Post 

Casa d'água


Sabe o que uma torre d'água construída em 1800 pode virar?! Uma residência absolutamente espetacular! Embora não seja novidade, a conversão de imóveis antigos cujos propósitos originais eram muito diferentes de uma moradia sempre causam surpresas, geralmente, muito agradáveis. É exatamente o caso desta fantástica construção que fica em Londres. Os arquitetos Leigh Osborne e Graham Voce foram os responsáveis pelo projeto de transformação que foi iniciado há quatro anos. A mistura de elementos antigos e modernos, os diferentes tipos de materiais e a maneira harmoniosa com que tudo foi incorporado garantiu o maravilhoso resultado que pode ser visto nas (muitas) fotos abaixo. São quatro quartos, salas amplas, sala de ginástica, entre outros, e um terraço com uma sensacional vista de 360º da capital.











Fonte: Bem Legaus 

miércoles, 28 de noviembre de 2012

Spectacular ice caves photographed for the first time deep beneath a Swiss glacier


These spectacular ice caves deep below a Swiss glacier have been mapped, photographed and surveyed for the first time.
A team of eight descended into the moulins – vertical shafts – below the Gorner Glacier near Zermatt in October.
Their work inside the remarkable icy caverns will help researchers get a better understanding of glaciers and their rate of melting.

Photographer Robbie Shone, 32, was part of the team. He said: ‘It was extremely spectacular. This was the first time I'd been in an ice cave and they were absolutely beautiful. They were a really bright blue.

‘Ice caves are more impressive “normal” caves. They offer a completely different challenge. I'm now fascinated by them and would like to visit more.

‘We were the first group to map these moulins and because the glaciers move around 15 metres (50ft) a year - they change every year. Because of this we will be the only people to see them in that state.

The team had to abseil into the moulins because the entrances were often vertical shafts that were up to 65ft deep. Mr Shone said: ‘We were camping for six days and because of the heavy snow we spent two days digging a path down to the glacier.
‘Our camp was about an hour away from the glacier and we got up at 5am to get ready and then spent around eight hours on the glacier. The temperature varied - at night time it dropped down as low as -18 degrees. The trip was a complete success and will help researchers get a better understanding of glaciers' rate of melting.’
The Gorner Glacier is 8.7miles long and is the second largest glacial system in the Alps.












Credits: Mail Oline
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